Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Orthopedics | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

November 2017 Briefing - Orthopedics

Last Updated: December 01, 2017.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for November 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Wait Time Linked to Worse Outcomes in Hip Fracture Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Increased wait time is associated with an increased risk of complications and 30-day mortality among adults undergoing hip fracture surgery, according to a study published in the Nov. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Often Uncomfortable With Overlapping Surgeries

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- On average, patients are neutral toward or uncomfortable with concurrent or overlapping surgical procedures, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Value-Based Payment Modifier Not Tied to Practice Performance

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Value-Based Payment Modifier (VM) is not associated with performance differences between practices serving higher-risk and lower-risk patients, according to a study published online Nov. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Clinician Denial of Patient Requests Impacts Satisfaction

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Clinician denial of some types of tests requested by patients is associated with worse patient satisfaction with the clinician, according to a study published online Nov. 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Essay Adds to Discourse on Impact of Suggestive Jokes

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seemingly benign, recurring patterns of joking around a single theme (joke cycles) can contribute to humorizing and legitimizing sexual misconduct, according to an essay published online Nov. 12 in Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies.

Abstract/Full Text

New Workflows Have Potential to Address Provider Burnout

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New solutions are needed to address burnout among health care team members, yet, in a catch-22 situation for health industry leaders, change fatigue contributes to burnout, according to a Vocera Communications report entitled In Pursuit of Resilience, Well-Being, and Joy in Healthcare.

More Information

Female Physicians' Spouses More Likely to Work

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Spouses of female physicians are on average more educated and work more hours outside the home than spouses of male physicians, according to a research letter published online Nov. 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High Costs Associated With Physician Burnout, Attrition

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are experiencing burnout are more than twice as likely to leave their organization within two years, and this is associated with significant economic costs, according to a report from the American Medical Association.

More Information

Surgery of Limited Clinical Benefit for Subacromial Shoulder Pain

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with subacromial shoulder pain, outcomes are better with arthroscopic subacromial decompression and investigational arthroscopy only, although the difference versus no treatment is not clinically important, according to a study published online Nov. 20 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Salivary miRNAs Can ID Duration of Concussion Symptoms

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For children with concussion, salivary microRNAs (miRNAs) can accurately identify the duration of symptoms, according to a study published online Nov. 20 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Fat Distribution May Influence Bone Strength in Adolescence

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in girls and central adiposity in boys play a role in the acquisition of bone strength during adolescence, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Simple Checklist Can Identify Useful Clinical Practice Guidelines

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A simple, easy-to-use checklist, the Guideline Trustworthiness, Relevance, and Utility Scoring Tool (G-TRUST), can identify useful clinical practice guidelines, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Many Health Care Providers Work While Sick

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than 40 percent of health care personnel (HCP) with influenza-like illness (ILI) work while ill, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract/Full Text

Force Analysis May Help Distinguish Surgeon Skill Level

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Force-sensing bipolar forceps and force analysis may help differentiate surgeon skill level, according to a study published online Nov. 15 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Docs' Preparedness Influences Exercise Recommendations

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care providers who feel prepared are more likely to recommend physical activity to patients with disabilities, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

Abstract/Full Text

High Levels of Burnout, Stress for U.S. Surgical Residents

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical residents have high levels of burnout, which is associated with high stress, depression, and suicidal ideation, according to a study published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Abstract/Full Text

Health Care Experts in Favor of Patient Contribution to Notes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Health care experts are supportive of OurNotes, an intervention in which patients and families co-produce medical notes with clinicians, according to a research letter published online Nov. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sport Sampling in Children Tied to More Exercise in Adolescence

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sport sampling in childhood may be associated with higher physical activity (PA) levels during adolescence, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text

Inhaled Corticosteroids Not Linked to Fracture in Children

TUESDAY, Nov. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Inhaled corticosteroids are not associated with increased odds of fracture in the pediatric asthma population, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors Have Extra Two Weeks to Preview Performance Data

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have two extra weeks to preview their 2016 performance information as a result of a mistake related to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Physician Compare online resource, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

More Information

Increases in U.S. Health Spending Tied to Health Service Price

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Factors including increases in health care service price and intensity are associated with increases in U.S. health care spending from 1996 to 2013, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

In ER, Combination of Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen Relieves Pain

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients presenting to the emergency department with acute extremity pain, the combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen does not differ in terms of pain reduction from three different opioid and acetaminophen combination analgesics, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise, Intervention Combos Associated With Lower Fall Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, exercise alone and combinations of interventions are associated with reduced risk of injurious falls, according to a review published online Nov. 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

USPSTF Posts Osteoporosis Screening Recommendations

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) draft recommendation statement and draft evidence review on Screening for Osteoporosis to Prevent Osteoporotic Fractures have been posted for public comment through Dec. 4, 2017.

Draft Recommendation Statement
Draft Evidence Review

Driving Impairment Warnings Often Not Given With Rx Meds

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Not all prescription drug users report receiving warnings about driving impairment, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

CMS Launches Initiative to Examine Impact of Regulations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has launched an initiative to examine which provider regulations should be discarded or revamped amid concerns that the regulations are reducing the amount of time that physicians spend with patients, according to an article published in Modern Healthcare.

More Information


Previous: November 2017 Briefing - Ophthalmology Next: November 2017 Briefing - Pediatrics

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: