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Category: Nephrology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2017 Briefing - Nephrology

Last Updated: December 01, 2017.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for November 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Over 5 Percent of Incident Cancer Due to Diabetes, High BMI

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than 5 percent of all incident cancers in 2012 were attributable to diabetes and high body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online Nov. 28 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Value-Based Payment Modifier Not Tied to Practice Performance

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Value-Based Payment Modifier (VM) is not associated with performance differences between practices serving higher-risk and lower-risk patients, according to a study published online Nov. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Clinician Denial of Patient Requests Impacts Satisfaction

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Clinician denial of some types of tests requested by patients is associated with worse patient satisfaction with the clinician, according to a study published online Nov. 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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New Workflows Have Potential to Address Provider Burnout

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New solutions are needed to address burnout among health care team members, yet, in a catch-22 situation for health industry leaders, change fatigue contributes to burnout, according to a Vocera Communications report entitled In Pursuit of Resilience, Well-Being, and Joy in Healthcare.

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Essay Adds to Discourse on Impact of Suggestive Jokes

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seemingly benign, recurring patterns of joking around a single theme (joke cycles) can contribute to humorizing and legitimizing sexual misconduct, according to an essay published online Nov. 12 in Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies.

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History of Prior Cancer Common in Newly Diagnosed Patients

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of patients diagnosed with incident cancer in the United States have a prior history of cancer, according to a brief report published online Nov. 22 in JAMA Oncology.

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Coffee Consumption Appears to Provide More Benefit Than Harm

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Coffee consumption seems safe and is associated with reduced risk for various health outcomes, according to a review published online Nov. 22 in The BMJ.

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Female Physicians' Spouses More Likely to Work

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Spouses of female physicians are on average more educated and work more hours outside the home than spouses of male physicians, according to a research letter published online Nov. 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Monoclonal Antibodies Cut Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody (CD47mAb) therapy reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury of renal allografts in an animal transplantation model, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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High Costs Associated With Physician Burnout, Attrition

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are experiencing burnout are more than twice as likely to leave their organization within two years, and this is associated with significant economic costs, according to a report from the American Medical Association.

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NOACs Show Lower Risk of Adverse Renal Outcomes in A-Fib

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are associated with lower risks of adverse renal outcomes than warfarin, according to a study published in the Nov. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Chronic Conditions Increasing Among Childbearing Women

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Between 2005 and 2014, the prevalence of chronic conditions increased across all segments of the childbearing population, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Simple Checklist Can Identify Useful Clinical Practice Guidelines

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A simple, easy-to-use checklist, the Guideline Trustworthiness, Relevance, and Utility Scoring Tool (G-TRUST), can identify useful clinical practice guidelines, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Intensive BP Control Lacks Benefit in Chronic Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive blood pressure (BP) control may provide no benefit and may even be harmful for patients with moderate-to-advanced chronic kidney disease, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Many Health Care Providers Work While Sick

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than 40 percent of health care personnel (HCP) with influenza-like illness (ILI) work while ill, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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First-Line Metformin Use for DM Up; Sulfonylurea Use Down

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with type 2 diabetes initiating antidiabetes drugs (ADDs), first-line use of metformin has increased since 2005, while sulfonylureas have remained the most popular second-line agent, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in Diabetes Care.

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Model Predicts Development of Chronic Kidney Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A multivariable model that uses routine laboratory data is able to predict advanced chronic kidney disease after hospitalization with acute kidney injury, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Leisure Time Exercise Linked to Reduced Mortality in T1DM

TUESDAY, Nov. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 1 diabetes, including those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) is associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Diabetes Care.

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Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Low With Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes, there is a very low incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), according to a Norwegian study published online October 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Doctors Have Extra Two Weeks to Preview Performance Data

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have two extra weeks to preview their 2016 performance information as a result of a mistake related to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Physician Compare online resource, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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ASCO Issues Statement Regarding Alcohol and Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol use is associated with certain types of cancer, and the risk of cancer can be reduced by strategies to prevent excessive use of alcohol, according to a statement published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Drop in Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Due to Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with diabetes listed as the primary cause (ESRD-D) decreased across the United States from 2000 to 2014, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Increases in U.S. Health Spending Tied to Health Service Price

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Factors including increases in health care service price and intensity are associated with increases in U.S. health care spending from 1996 to 2013, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Intensity of Exercise Affects Impact on Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Total physical activity (PA) and moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA) are inversely associated with mortality, though light-intensity PA and sedentary behavior are not associated with mortality, according to a research letter published online Nov. 6 in Circulation.

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Sertraline Treatment No Benefit for Depressive Symptoms in CKD

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sertraline treatment does not significantly improve depressive symptoms among patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), according to a study published online Nov. 3 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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ASN: Promising Diagnostic Marker for Fibrillary GN Identified

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), according to two studies published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, being held Oct. 31 to Nov. 5 in New Orleans.

Abstract -- Andeen
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Abstract -- Dasari
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Pricing Interventions Increase Sales, Intake of Healthy Foods

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Pricing interventions seem to improve access to healthy food and beverage options with increases in stocking and sales of these items, according to a review published online Nov. 2 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Driving Impairment Warnings Often Not Given With Rx Meds

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Not all prescription drug users report receiving warnings about driving impairment, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

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Nutritional Therapy Beneficial in Chronic Kidney Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nutritional interventions may be beneficial for the management of chronic kidney disease in adults, according to a review article published online Nov. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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ACE Inhibitor, Statin No Benefit for T1DM, High Albumin Excretion

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For adolescents with type 1 diabetes and high levels of albumin excretion, neither angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors nor statins change the albumin-to-creatinine ratio over time, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CMS Launches Initiative to Examine Impact of Regulations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has launched an initiative to examine which provider regulations should be discarded or revamped amid concerns that the regulations are reducing the amount of time that physicians spend with patients, according to an article published in Modern Healthcare.

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