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L. reuteri DSM17938 Effective for Colic in Breastfed Infants

Last Updated: December 27, 2017.

Lactobacillus reuteri DSM17938 is effective for breastfed infants with colic, according to a meta-analysis published online Dec. 26 in Pediatrics.

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lactobacillus reuteri DSM17938 is effective for breastfed infants with colic, according to a meta-analysis published online Dec. 26 in Pediatrics.

Valerie Sung, Ph.D., from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues performed an individual participant data meta-analysis to examine whether L. reuteri DSM17398 reduces crying and/or fussing time in infants with colic. Data were included from four randomized controlled trials of L. reuteri DSM17398 versus placebo delivered orally to 345 infants with colic (174 received probiotics and 171 placebo). Infant crying and/or fussing duration and treatment success at 21 days were the outcomes studied.

The researchers found that at all time points, the probiotic group averaged less crying and/or fussing time than the placebo group (day 21 adjusted mean difference in change from baseline, −25.4 minutes). At all time points the probiotic group was almost twice as likely as the placebo group to experience treatment success (day 21 adjusted incidence ratio, 1.7). Dramatic intervention effects were seen in breastfed infants (number needed to treat for day 21 success, 2.6), while effects were insignificant for formula-fed infants.

"L. reuteri DSM17938 is effective and can be recommended for breastfed infants with colic," the authors write. "Its role in formula-fed infants with colic needs further research."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and nutrition industries.

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