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Effective Treatments Exist for Nausea, Vomiting of Pregnancy

Last Updated: December 28, 2017.

Early treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy can prevent complications, according to a Practice Bulletin published online Dec. 21 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

THURSDAY, Dec. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy can prevent complications, according to a Practice Bulletin published online Dec. 21 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Susan M. Ramin, M.D., in collaboration with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on Obstetric Practice, reviewed the evidence relating to diagnosis and management of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy.

The researchers note that the presence of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy may be minimized by obstetricians, obstetric care providers, and pregnant women, as morning sickness is common in early pregnancy, and consequently, it may be undertreated. Concerns about the safety of medications mean some women do not seek treatment. It can be more difficult to control symptoms once nausea and vomiting of pregnancy progresses. Treatment in the early stages can avert more serious complications. For more severe cases, safe and effective treatments are available; mild cases can be resolved with changes to lifestyle and diet. Treatment with vitamin B6 alone or with doxylamine is safe and effective and should be considered for first-line pharmacotherapy.

"Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy should be distinguished from nausea and vomiting related to other causes," the authors write. "The purpose of this document is to review the best available evidence about the diagnosis and management of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy."

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