Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Cardiology | Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Pathology | Psychiatry | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Mortality, CVD, T2DM Risks Not Up for Living Kidney Donors

Last Updated: January 29, 2018.

Living kidney donors have no increased risks for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or adverse psychological health outcomes, according to a review published online Jan. 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Living kidney donors have no increased risks for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or adverse psychological health outcomes, according to a review published online Jan. 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Linda M. O'Keeffe, Ph.D., from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, and colleagues reviewed the evidence about mid- and long-term health risks associated with living kidney donation in adults. Data were included from 52 studies, with 118,426 living kidney donors and 117,656 non-donors followed for an average of one to 24 years.

The researchers found that there was no evidence for increased risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or adverse psychosocial health outcomes for living kidney donors versus non-donor populations. Higher diastolic blood pressure, lower estimated glomerular filtration rates, and higher risk for end-stage renal disease (relative risk, 8.83) were reported for donors, as was increased preeclampsia risk for female donors (relative risk, 2.12). However, donors had low absolute risk for end-stage renal disease (incidence rate, 0.5 per 1,000 person-years) and preeclampsia (incidence rate, 5.9 events per 100 pregnancies) despite the increased relative risks.

"Compared with non-donor populations, living kidney donors have no increased risk for other major chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, or for adverse psychosocial outcomes," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Regulators Trying to Reduce Physician Burden Linked to EHR Next: Case Report: Fentanyl Use Associated With Amnesia

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: