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February 2018 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: March 01, 2018.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for February 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Alternatives to Whole Liver Transplants Feasible for Children

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Alternatives to whole liver transplants for children have become safer, according to a study published recently in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Early Studies Often Show Exaggerated Treatment Effect

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Trials to evaluate drugs or devices used to treat chronic medical conditions that are published early in the chain of evidence often show an exaggerated treatment effect compared with subsequent trials, according to research published online Feb. 21 in the Mayo Clinical Proceedings.

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Sleeve Gastrectomy Tied to Drop in GDM, Excessive Fetal Growth

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is associated with a lower rate of gestational diabetes mellitus and excessive fetal growth, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Understanding Rx Nonadherence Can Improve Adherence

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Understanding nonadherence in patients and encouraging a change in attitude toward patients and their medication can improve medication adherence, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Recommendations for Optimizing Hidden Curriculum in Medicine

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians (ACP) presents recommendations for optimizing clinical learning environments by fostering a positive hidden curriculum in medicine.

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Artificial Intelligence May Help Prevent Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Feb. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence (AI), in which computers can be trained to recognize patterns in large quantities of data, may be able to reduce physicians' burdens, saving them time and energy, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Risk Factors for Recurrence of Acute Diverticulitis Identified

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Certain patient factors increase the risk of recurrent acute diverticulitis, according to a study published in the March issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum.

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GI Surgical Site Infections Higher in Low-Income Countries

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The burden of surgical site infection (SSI) after gastrointestinal surgery is greater for countries with low income as classified by the U.N. Human Development Index (HDI), according to a study published online Feb. 13 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Gut Microbiota May Affect Vertical Transmission of Being Overweight

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The correlation between maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and childhood overweight at ages 1 and 3 years may be mediated by birth mode and infant gut microbiota, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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CDC: No Change in Percentage of Uninsured in U.S. From '16 to '17

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of uninsured U.S. persons of all ages did not change significantly from 2016 to the first nine months of 2017, according to a report published online Feb. 22 by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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No Evidence Use of SEP-1 Bundle Ups Survival in Sepsis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with sepsis, use of the Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Early Management Bundle (SEP-1) or its hemodynamic interventions is not associated with improved survival, according to a review published online Feb. 19 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Fecal Immunochemical Test Predicts Mucosal Healing in UC

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is a reliable noninvasive marker for predicting mucosal healing (MH) in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, according to a review published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Burnout Found Prevalent Among Doctors in Single Health System

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout is prevalent among physicians, affecting over one-third of physicians in a single health system, and is associated with health care delivery, according to a research letter published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Mortality Risks of Exclusive Cigar, Cigarette, Pipe Use ID'd

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exclusive current cigarette and cigar use is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Bariatric Surgery Linked to Discontinuing Diabetes Meds

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Antidiabetes treatment discontinuation rates are higher for obese individuals undergoing bariatric surgery, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in JAMA Surgery.

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Many in Oregon View Alcohol As More Harmful Than Marijuana

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Just more than half of surveyed adults consider alcohol to be more harmful than marijuana, according to a study published in the April issue of Preventive Medicine.

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Patients Want Physicians to Have Greater Connectivity

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients want greater connectivity, online tools and text messaging, as well as more time with their physicians, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Ultra-Processed Food Linked to Increased Overall Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of ultra-processed food is associated with increased risk of overall and breast cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in The BMJ.

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Four Best Practices Outlined to Prevent Health Care Cyberattacks

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Four best practices outlined that can help prevent health care cyberattacks, which increased from 2016 to 2017, according to a report published in Managed Healthcare Executive.

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Pre-Op Weight Loss Improves Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Excess weight loss (EWL) immediately preceding bariatric surgery is associated with improved outcomes, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Disparities Seen in Gastric Cancer Patients' Receipt of Pre-Op Chemo

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic disparities in the use of preoperative chemotherapy exist among patients with gastric cancer in the United States, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in Cancer.

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Education About Imaging Most Often Given by Ordering Provider

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing imaging examinations, 78 percent reported receiving some form of pre-examination information, while 52 percent sought information themselves, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Radiology.

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EHRs Not Sufficient to Ensure Success in Value-Based Care

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) are not sufficient to ensure success in value-based care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Ultrasound for Rectal Cancer Staging Tied to More Chemoradiation

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for rectal cancer (RC) staging is associated with higher use of neoadjuvant chemoradiation but no significant improvement in overall survival, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Top Consumer Concerns Reported About Physicians

FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Health care consumers have four major concerns regarding their physicians, according to a report published by Managed Healthcare Executive.

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FDA Says U.S. Will Now Produce Critical MRI Component

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A long-feared shortage of a substance used in millions of medical imaging procedures each year in the United States appears to have been avoided, federal officials report.

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Poll: Personal Beliefs Shouldn't Allow Doctors to Refuse to Treat

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most people do not believe that professionals including health care providers should be allowed to refuse to provide services based on their conscience or beliefs, according to a recent HealthDay/The Harris Poll.

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Stem Cell Transplant May Be Effective for Systemic Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for systemic sclerosis (SSc), according to a small study published online Feb. 2 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Expenditures Rising for Treating Obesity-Related Illness in U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The amount of U.S. health care resources devoted to treating obesity-related illness in U.S. adults rose 29 percent from 2001 to 2015, according to a review published in the January issue of Clinical Chemistry.

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Mutations Common in Pancreatic CA, History of Other Cancers

TUESDAY, Feb. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of individuals with pancreatic cancer and a history of other hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC)- or Lynch syndrome (LS)-related cancers have mutations in a prostate cancer susceptibility gene, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Cancer.

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Hot Tea + Alcohol or Smoking May Up Esophageal Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of tea at high temperatures in combination with alcohol and tobacco exposure is associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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IV Bevacizumab Effective for Severe HHT-Related Bleeding

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with severe hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)-related bleeding, intravenous bevacizumab is effective, according to a study published in the February issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Humanities Exposure Positively Impacts Medical Students

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the humanities correlates with less burnout and higher levels of positive personal qualities among medical students, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Factors Identified That Impact Physicians IT Adoption

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have considerable concerns about the efficacy and evidence base of health information technology (IT), according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Medicaid Expansion Cuts Out-of-Pocket Spending

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- States that expanded Medicaid cut the probability of non-elderly near-poor adults being uninsured and lowered average out-of-pocket spending, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Health Affairs.

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