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ACC: Cocaine/Marijuana May Up Mortality in Younger MI Patients

Last Updated: March 13, 2018.

Cocaine and/or marijuana use is present in about 10 percent of myocardial infarction patients age ≤50 years and is associated with increased mortality, according to a study published online March 10 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 10 to 12 in Orlando, Fla.

TUESDAY, March 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cocaine and/or marijuana use is present in about 10 percent of myocardial infarction (MI) patients age ≤50 years and is associated with increased mortality, according to a study published online March 10 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 10 to 12 in Orlando, Fla.

Ersilia M. DeFilippis, M.D., from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues examined the prevalence of cocaine and marijuana use in adults with their first MI at ≤50 years. Records of patients presenting with a Type 1 MI from 2000 to 2016 were reviewed. Data were included for 2,097 patients with Type 1 MI who were followed for a median of 11.2 years.

The researchers found that 10.7 percent of patients overall had use of cocaine (4.7 percent) and/or marijuana (6.0 percent). The rates of diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly lower among individuals with substance use, while tobacco use was significantly more likely. After adjustment for baseline covariates, there was a correlation for use of cocaine and/or marijuana with significantly higher cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (hazard ratios, 2.22 and 1.99, respectively).

"These findings reinforce current recommendations for substance use screening among young adults with an MI, and highlight the need for counseling to prevent future adverse events," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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