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Stent-Assisted Embolization Feasible for Aneurysms

Last Updated: August 27, 2009.

In patients with acutely ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms that are otherwise difficult to treat, stent-assisted coil embolization may be an effective strategy, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Radiology.

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acutely ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms that are otherwise difficult to treat, stent-assisted coil embolization may be an effective strategy, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Radiology.

Olli I. Tahtinen, M.D., of Tampere University Hospital in Finland, and colleagues studied 61 patients (20 men, 41 women; mean age, 55.1 years) who had a mean angiographic follow-up of 12.1 months.

The researchers found that stent-assisted coil embolization was associated with a technical success rate of 72 percent, a technique-related complication rate of 21 percent, and a 30-day mortality rate of 20 percent. They observed only one case of rebleeding, and found that 69 percent of patients had Glasgow Outcome Scale scores of four or five by the conclusion of the study period.

"The data published thus far on stent-assisted coil embolization concentrate on non-ruptured aneurysms," the authors write. "However, the clinical treatment decision is more complicated in cases of acutely ruptured aneurysms. The ruptured wide-necked aneurysm can be difficult to treat with surgical ligation or balloon-assisted embolization, and stent-assisted embolization may offer an important addition to the treatment repertoire. To our knowledge, the present study describes the most extensive experience to date with stent-assisted coil embolization during the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage."

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