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Live Birth Has Little Effect on Kidney Transplant Recipients

Last Updated: September 25, 2009.

In women with a functioning kidney transplant, a live birth has no significant effect on either graft or patient survival, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In women with a functioning kidney transplant, a live birth has no significant effect on either graft or patient survival, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Vicki Levidiotis, M.D., of Western Hospital in Victoria, Australia, and colleagues analyzed 40 years of data on pregnancy-related outcomes for transplant recipients, including 444 live births reported from 577 pregnancies.

The researchers found that 97 percent of achieved pregnancies occurred more than a year after transplantation, and that the overall mean age at the time of pregnancy of 29 years increased to 32 years during the last decade of the study. When the researchers compared outcomes in 120 parous and 120 matched nulliparous recipients, they found that a first live birth did not have any significant effect on 20-year graft survival or patient survival.

"This historical population described, unlike more recent cohorts, of note those in the United States, was composed of only 4 percent of patients with diabetes or hypertension," the authors write. "The cause of end-stage kidney disease in this cohort was dominated by glomerular (43 percent) and reflux disease (36 percent). It is imperative to consider that patients who have diabetes and receive a transplant have poorer survival than transplant recipients who do not have diabetes, and this historical outcome analysis of pregnancies may not be generalizable to patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes or cohorts that are composed of patients with a different spectrum of diseases."

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