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Category: Pathology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2009 Briefing - Pathology

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Breast Cancer Outcome Can Be Affected by Social Support

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who are socially isolated may be more likely to have tumor growth as a result of the stress caused by loneliness, compared to their more socially supported counterparts, according to a study in mice published online Sept. 29 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Leptin-Impaired Obese Mice Not Found to Develop Arthritis

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In leptin-impaired mice, the resulting extreme obesity does not cause knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Prognostic Tool May Benefit GI Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo surgery to remove primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a new computer-based tool called a nomogram accurately predicts the risk of cancer recurrence and may help clinicians determine which patients are candidates for adjuvant imatinib therapy, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Exertional Illnesses Linked to Anesthesia Complication

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Possible links exist between heat- and exercise-related illnesses that strike even the physically fit and a feared complication of anesthesia, according to a review in the October issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Baseline Factors May Predict Mortality Risk in Myelofibrosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Three baseline factors in the bone marrow disease myelofibrosis can be used to identify patients at the highest risk of death, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Study Examines Effects of In Utero Heart Procedure

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Successful fetal aortic valvuloplasty may lead to better growth of the aortic and mitral valves and the ascending aorta without change in left ventricular growth rate, according to research published online Sept. 28 in Circulation.

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Autoantibody May Increase Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a particular autoimmune antibody have a much higher risk of having a stroke or heart attack, with an even higher risk if they take oral contraceptives or smoke, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Study Looks at Screening and Bilirubin Encephalopathy

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of screening for hyperbilirubinemia on the incidence of acute and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy remains unknown, according to research published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

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Meningococcal Disease Jabs Should Be Repeated for Some

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- One dose of the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine may not be enough to confer ongoing protection, and vaccination should be repeated in those at high risk, according to a study in the Sept. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Recurrence of Frank Hematuria Requires Careful Assessment

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who have an initial episode of frank hematuria without a diagnosis, followed by a later recurrence, thorough evaluation is necessary due to a substantial risk of urological cancer, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Efficacy of Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test Explored

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although the rapid influenza diagnostic test can accurately predict confirmed infection with pandemic H1N1 influenza, the test produces too many false negatives to be of use in the management of the disease pandemic, according to a study in the Sept. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Test Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnostic test using cells from bronchoalveolar lavage is quick and effective in distinguishing active tuberculosis infection from latent infection in patients with suspected tuberculosis where the bacteria are undetectable in sputum, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Moderate Drinking May Reduce Men's Risk of Heart Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In hypertensive men, moderate drinking may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. However, in men and women at moderate risk of heart disease, pomegranate juice appears to have no effect on the overall progression of carotid intima-media thickness, according to two studies in the Oct. 1 American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract - Britton
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Abstract - Davidson
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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Study Casts Further Doubt on PSA for Cancer Screening

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Based on likelihood ratios, prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentrations at any cutoff value didn't meet the criteria needed for a screening test, according to research published online Sept. 24 in BMJ.

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Obesity Can Lead to Resistance to Insulin-Like Hormone

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary obesity leads to whole body and vascular resistance to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) through its effects on the vasculature and glucose metabolism, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Role of Nitric Oxide Studied in Antibiotic Resistance

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Nitric oxide created by bacterial nitric oxide synthases (bNOS) may help protect bacteria from numerous antibiotics, according to research published in the Sept. 11 issue of Science.

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Folate Linked to Fewer Deaths in Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of folate may reduce the long-term risk of death in patients with coronary artery disease and elevated homocysteine, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Fat Hormone May Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Diabetics

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A fragment of the fat hormone adiponectin improves glucose and lipid metabolism and restores insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant diabetic mice, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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New Tool May Accurately Predict Cervical Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new tool for assessing cervical cancer risk may offer clinicians a simpler method for making treatment decisions than commonly used management algorithms, according to an article published online Sept. 20 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Live-Virus Vaccine Shows Promise Against Rabies

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A rabies vaccine made with a live virus lacking a gene needed for replication appears safe and effective with a simpler dosing regimen than the current post-exposure vaccine, according to results of animal studies published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Gene Mutations Linked to Hereditary Immunodeficiency

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Gene mutations leading to a lack of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes are associated with a hereditary combined immunodeficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Interventions Could Reduce Maternal Mortality in Africa

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Improved health facilities and greater access to misoprostol and antibiotics in the community could prevent thousands of maternal deaths in Africa annually, according to research published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Study Finds Obesity Impairs Leukemia Treatment Response

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity may directly impair the efficacy of leukemia treatment, according to an animal study published online Sept. 22 in Cancer Research.

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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Helps Avert Melanoma Relapse

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation may help prevent melanoma relapse and increase the chance that tumors will be thinner if relapse does occur, according to research published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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HPV Load in Cervical Tumors Can Affect Relapse, Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Uterine cervical cancer patients with low human papillomavirus (HPV) viral loads in their tumors have a higher risk of cancer relapse after treatment with radiotherapy and exhibit worse disease-free survival, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Inflammation Linked to Peripheral Atherosclerosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammatory markers are consistently associated with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and particular outcomes, but are not necessarily causally associated; and, although genetics may play an important role, no genetic marker has been associated with the disease, according to a review in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Alcohol Linked to Decreased Mortality After Head Injury

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with traumatic brain injuries who test positive for alcohol are less likely to die but more likely to have complications than patients who test negative, according to a study in the September issue of Archives of Surgery.

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Tanning May Put Very-Light-Skinned Youth at Higher Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Very-light-skinned children who tan develop more nevi than their counterparts who do not, which may indicate increased risk of developing melanoma when they are older, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology, while another study in the same issue recommends more states implement controls on youth access to tanning facilities.

Abstract - Aalborg
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Abstract - Pichon
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Pain Linked to Functional Decline in Middle-Aged Adults

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged adults, pain is associated with an accelerated decline in physical function, with mobility limitations similar to those decades older without pain, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Papers Look at Lung Cancer Factors in Never Smokers

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A guide to lung cancer in never smokers offers an overview of the disease, a description of the epidemiology and risk factors for lung cancer in those who have never smoked, and differences in molecular profiles between this group and smokers, as published in three papers in the Sept. 15 Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract - Samet
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Abstract - Rudin
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Abstract - Overview
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Mediterranean Diet More Costly to Follow Than Western

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish university graduates who tended to follow a Mediterranean diet spent more money for their food than those following a western diet, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Study Explores Genetic Links to Crohn's Complications

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic polymorphisms may be associated with risk of certain complications in individuals with Crohn's disease, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Tutorial Improves Doctor Comfort With Down Syndrome

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- An interactive tutorial involving hypothetical patient scenarios improves residents' knowledge and comfort in delivering a diagnosis of Down syndrome, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Heart Risks in Midlife Reduce Men's Life Expectancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged men with cardiovascular risk factors, long-term life expectancy is significantly shortened even if they subsequently modify those risk factors, according to a study published Sept. 17 in BMJ.

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Drug May Be Effective for Optical Autoimmune Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mycophenolate mofetil may be a safe and effective treatment for neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology. A related study in the same issue concludes that an immunofluorescence (IF) assay is much more sensitive than an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay in diagnosing the disease.

Abstract - Jacob
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Abstract - McKeon
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SPDEF Tied to Overproduction of Mucus in Lung Disorders

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- SPDEF (SAM Pointed Domain Ets-like Factor) plays an important role in regulating a transcriptional network that induces pulmonary goblet cell differentiation and overproduction of mucus, according to research published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Information Limited on Testing Technologies in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although information about the clinical use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing strategies in breast cancer patients is limited, evidence suggests that there are significant variations in testing practices and important knowledge gaps, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer.

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Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Diabetes Drug Combination Can Eliminate Breast Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancers are virtually eliminated in mice treated with a combination of the diabetes drug metformin and the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin due to their ability to kill cancer stem cells, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer Research.

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Celiac Disease Linked to Modestly Increased Death Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with confirmed or latent celiac disease -- including those who underwent small-intestinal biopsy in childhood -- there is a modestly increased risk of death, according to a study in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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Conservative Management in Prostate Cancer Feasible

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In older men with localized prostate cancer, conservative management is associated with significantly improved 10-year outcomes compared to earlier eras, according to a study published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Portion of Population at Low Cardio Risk Down Since 1999

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A modest increase in the portion of the U.S. population at low cardiovascular risk from 1971 to 1994 has reversed since 1999, pointing out the need for greater efforts at lifestyle modification and prevention, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Circulation.

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Combat Exposures Can Increase Hypertension Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan who experience the stress of combat are at greater risk for developing hypertension than those who deploy but do not experience combat, but at lower hypertension risk than those soldiers who do not deploy at all, according to a study by the U.S. Department of Defense published online Sept. 14 in Hypertension.

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Joint Pain Can Accompany Aromatase Therapy

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving aromatase inhibitors (AIs) adjunctively can experience joint pain, marked by fluid buildup in joints, localized inflammation of tendon sheaths, and carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

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HLA Alleles May Help Stratify Celiac Disease Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at risk for celiac disease, it's possible to stratify risk on the basis of HLA-DQ genotype, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Study Explores Framingham Score, CAD Relationship

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is a strong correlation between Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and the development of functionally relevant obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Drug Shown to Aid Patients With Resistant Hypertension

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The vasodilator darusentan significantly lowers blood pressure in patients whose hypertension is resistant to current drugs, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in The Lancet.

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FDA Clears Test to Help Detect Ovarian Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- On Sept. 11, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared OVA1, a test that helps detect ovarian cancer in women with pelvic masses requiring surgery. OVA1 was developed by Vermillion Inc., headquartered in Fremont, Calif., in conjunction with researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

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New Prostate Stem Cell May Be a Source of Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of prostate stem cell isolated from adult mice may be a source of prostate cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Nature.

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Studies Explore Genetic Factors Underlying Depression

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple genetic factors may help predict patient response to antidepressants, and a haplotype in the CRHR1 gene may help protect individuals who were subjected to childhood mistreatment from depression in adulthood, according to the results of two studies published in the September Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Polanczyk
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Abstract - Ising
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Perineural Invasion Points to Colorectal Cancer Outcomes

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Perineural invasion (PNI) is often not included in pathology reports for colorectal cancer, but it may serve as a predictor of outcomes in these cases, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mutated H1N1 Virus Resistant to Antiviral Drug Oseltamivir

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of H1N1 mutations resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in two adolescent girls sharing a cabin at a North Carolina camp prompted a new recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the proper prophylactic use of antiviral drugs, according to a case report in the Sept. 11 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Twin Study Eyes Inflammation in Those With Bipolar Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An association between proinflammatory monocytes and bipolar disorder is largely due to a common shared environmental factor, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Poverty-Mortality Association Unchanged in England

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite myriad medical, public health, social, economic and political changes, the association between poverty and mortality in England and Wales is as strong today as it was at the start of the 20th century, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

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S. pneumoniae Leads to Death in Many Under 5

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 11 percent of all deaths in children aged 1 to 59 months are due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and greater efforts to prevent and treat disease associated with the bacterium could help attain the United Nations Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of The Lancet.

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One Dose of H1N1 Vaccine May Offer Substantial Protection

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary research indicates that just a single dose of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine can substantially increase protective antibodies, but vaccinations with seasonal flu vaccine provide minimal cross-reactive antibody response, according to several studies published online Sept. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Greenberg
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Adiponectin Associated With Childhood Lymphoma

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of adiponectin, but not leptin, are associated with childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as well as a poorer prognosis, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA Panel Recommends HPV Vaccine Gardasil for Males

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel is recommending that the vaccine Gardasil be given to boys and young men to help prevent genital warts. The same panel has determined that another human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, Cervarix, seems safe for preventing cervical cancer in females ages 10 to 25 years.

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Gene Variant Linked to Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A gene variant associated with type 2 diabetes is unusual among previously linked loci in being associated with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, rather than impaired pancreatic beta cell function, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Nature Genetics.

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Lapatinib Minimally Effective Against Liver Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lapatinib is not effective in reducing disease progression in patients with advanced liver cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Viruria Could Help Predict Rare Condition in Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Analyzing the urine of multiple sclerosis patients for JC virus could help identify those at risk of developing another rare demyelinating disease after natalizumab (Tysabri) treatment, according to a study in the Sept. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. And two additional reports detail cases of this rare condition, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).

Abstract - Chen
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Most H1N1 Flu Patients Don't Need Antiviral Medication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral medications should be used to treat H1N1 swine flu only in people who are hospitalized from the flu or are at high risk of complications from it, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Higher Bone Lead Levels Linked to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Lead concentration in the bones accumulated in prior decades of environmental exposure is associated with all-cause and all-cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation.

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Infections Linked to Mental Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Acute systemic inflammation linked to episodes of illness or injury may speed the rate of cognitive decline in individuals with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of Neurology.

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Lifestyle Factors May Affect Breast Cancer Relapse Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In women with estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer, three potentially modifiable lifestyle factors -- obesity, current smoking, and alcohol consumption -- may increase the risk of contralateral breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Gene Linked to Cystic Fibrosis With Liver Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The SERPINA1 Z allele is associated with severe liver disease with portal hypertension in patients with cystic fibrosis (CFLD), according to a study in the Sept. 9 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dopamine Reward Pathway Linked to ADHD Deficits

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Rewards-motivation deficits reported in people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be associated with a disruption in the mesoaccumbens dopamine reward pathway evidenced by reduced dopamine synaptic markers seen in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain, according to a study in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Guideline Reduces Antibiotics Usage, Adverse Drug Effects

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of lower respiratory tract infections, procalcitonin-based guidelines may lead to lower rates of antibiotic exposure and associated adverse effects without increasing adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Study Implicates Hippocampal Region in Schizophrenia

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A subfield of the hippocampal formation may be involved in the early stages of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Antibiotic Class Linked to Double Vision

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics is associated with double vision, according to a study in the September issue of Ophthalmology.

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Exercise Helps Keep Weight Regain at Bay

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise helps stop weight regain after weight loss, according to the findings of a study in rats published in the September issue of the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

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Chronic Alcohol Consumption Interferes With Body Clock

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic alcohol consumption interferes with circadian rhythms in hamsters, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

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H1N1 Vaccines Appear Safe for Adults, Children

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The new H1N1 swine flu vaccine appears to be as safe as the seasonal flu variety, according to experts from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; and, intravenous use of the antiviral zanamivir (Relenza) may provide a lifesaving alternative for severe cases of H1N1 pneumonitis, according to a report published online Sept. 4 in The Lancet.

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Appetite Hormone Acts on Brain to Regulate Bone

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The fat hormone leptin regulates bone mass and suppresses appetite by acting through serotonin pathways in the brain, according to a study in the Sept. 4 issue of Cell.

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HIV-Associated Dementia Linked to Disease Subtype

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-associated cognitive impairment may be more common in persons who are infected with the HIV subtype D, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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AHA Advocates Atherosclerosis Assessment in Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In a scientific statement published online Sept. 3 in Hypertension, the American Heart Association has promulgated recommendations for a standardized approach to the noninvasive assessment of children and adolescents for the earliest signs of approaching atherosclerosis.

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Study Supports MRI Use for Renal Lesions in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is acceptable imaging to be performed in women with renal lesions incidentally detected during routine antenatal ultrasonography, according to a study in the September issue of Urology.

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Mutant Mice Offer Model for Study of Arthritis Pathogenesis

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Mice with a defective gene that impairs collagen production needed for joint maintenance may provide a model for the investigation of the pathogenesis and treatment of osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease (DDD), according to a study in the September issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Prenatal Smoking Linked to Different DNA Methylation

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero may have long-term health effects due to alterations of DNA methylation, according to research published in the September issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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RSV Infection Has Different Effect Throughout Airways

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of bronchial cells induces transcript and protein overexpression of nerve growth factor, which may protect the cells against virus-induced apoptosis, but the same does not occur in nasal and tracheal cells, according to research published online July 31 in PLoS One.

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Race Not Shown to Affect Liver Transplant Outcome

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplant outcomes for patients with hepatitis B are similar regardless of whether the patient is Caucasian, Asian-American or African-American, according to a study in the September issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Breast Cancer Metastasis Gene Linked to Poor Survival

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a gene involved in glucose metabolism and cell death is higher in breast cancer brain metastases compared with primary tumors, and high expression is associated with poor survival, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Molecular Cancer Research.

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Gene Involved in Osteoporosis Development Identified

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A gene important in blocking the formation of osteoclasts, which break down bone, promotes osteoporosis in mice if missing, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in Nature Medicine.

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House Screens Key in Preventing Malaria Transmission

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Houses with screening have fewer mosquitoes indoors, which may help prevent malaria-related anemia in children, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in The Lancet.

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New Cancer Drug Targets Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug, GDC-0449, that targets the hedgehog pathway has shown promise in the treatment of basal-cell cancer and medulloblastoma, according to two reports and an editorial published online Sept. 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Carbon Monoxide Exposure Linked to Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease episodes in urban areas rise with same-day increases in the environmental level of carbon monoxide (CO), according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

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Blood Test May Help Identify Pancreatic Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- MicroRNA profiling in plasma may allow for the early


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