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Category: Radiology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2009 Briefing - Radiology

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Imaging Modality Shows Great Promise in Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is the new "gold standard imaging technique" for the assessment of heart anatomy, function and viability in heart failure patients, according to a report in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Leptin-Impaired Obese Mice Not Found to Develop Arthritis

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In leptin-impaired mice, the resulting extreme obesity does not cause knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Imaging for Heart Disease Severity Impacts Treatment

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery disease (CAD) patients who underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) to stratify disease severity subsequently had treatment and risk factor control stepped up, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Prognostic Tool May Benefit GI Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo surgery to remove primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a new computer-based tool called a nomogram accurately predicts the risk of cancer recurrence and may help clinicians determine which patients are candidates for adjuvant imatinib therapy, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Ultrasound Found Inadequate for Lymph Node Biopsy

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound scanners currently do not have sufficient resolution to biopsy sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) for evidence of cancer metastasis and cannot replace conventional SLN biopsy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Imaging Modalities for Heart Disease in Diabetics Compared

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) was superior to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at detecting coronary artery disease among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Surgery May Be Better Than Other Carpal Tunnel Therapies

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome produced better outcomes than non-surgical therapies, but the clinical advantage was modest, according to a study in the Sept. 26 issue of The Lancet.

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Study Explores Head, Neck Cancer Radiation Completion

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with head and neck cancer, having surgery or chemotherapy may influence their likelihood of completing radiotherapy, according to research published in the September Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Guidelines Offered for Emergency Pediatric Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A joint policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics and American College of Emergency Physicians, intended to help hospital emergency departments maintain the appropriate resources and personnel to properly serve pediatric patients, has been published online Sept. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Most Pregnant Women Can Safely Fly

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women can safely fly as long as they do not have any obstetric or other medical complications, according to recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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HPV Load in Cervical Tumors Can Affect Relapse, Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Uterine cervical cancer patients with low human papillomavirus (HPV) viral loads in their tumors have a higher risk of cancer relapse after treatment with radiotherapy and exhibit worse disease-free survival, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Overweight Can Complicate Aneuploidy Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although body mass index does not affect the visual quality of nuchal translucency ultrasound tests, women with a higher body mass index take longer to complete the test and more need transvaginal ultrasound compared with normal weight women, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Scoliosis Surgery Linked to Good Long-Term Outcomes

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the long term, patients who receive surgical treatment for scoliosis are no more likely to develop low back pain or have an impaired quality of life than the general population, according to two studies in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

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Pain Linked to Functional Decline in Middle-Aged Adults

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged adults, pain is associated with an accelerated decline in physical function, with mobility limitations similar to those decades older without pain, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Search Finds Higher Pediatric Ischemic Stroke Rate

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Using radiology searches results in a substantially higher estimate of the incidence of pediatric ischemic stroke than previous estimates, according to research published online Sept. 17 in Stroke.

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Exercise, Shockwave Therapy Compared for Shoulder Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with subacromial shoulder pain, supervised exercise improves shoulder mobility and lessens pain better than extracorporeal shockwave treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in BMJ.

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More Evidence Needed on Charged-Particle Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Research comparing the safety and effectiveness of charged-particle radiation therapy with other treatments for cancer is scant, pointing to a need for comparative studies, preferably randomized trials, according to research published online Sept. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Lipid Screening Cost Effective for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Lipid screening in survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma who receive mediastinal irradiation, which increases their risk of coronary heart disease, is most cost effective if done every three years, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Conservative Management in Prostate Cancer Feasible

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In older men with localized prostate cancer, conservative management is associated with significantly improved 10-year outcomes compared to earlier eras, according to a study published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prediction Rules for Brain Injury Can Cut Down on Scans

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Children at very low risk for brain injury following head trauma can be identified using a set of prediction rules that obviate the need for a computed tomography (CT) scan, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in The Lancet.

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New Microcephaly Evaluation Guidelines Issued

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Because microcephaly is associated with developmental delays, learning disorders and neurologic conditions, children with microcephaly should be screened for such problems, according to a special article published in the Sept. 15 issue of Neurology.

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Study Explores Framingham Score, CAD Relationship

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is a strong correlation between Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and the development of functionally relevant obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Higher Bone Lead Levels Linked to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Lead concentration in the bones accumulated in prior decades of environmental exposure is associated with all-cause and all-cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation.

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Dopamine Reward Pathway Linked to ADHD Deficits

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Rewards-motivation deficits reported in people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be associated with a disruption in the mesoaccumbens dopamine reward pathway evidenced by reduced dopamine synaptic markers seen in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain, according to a study in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Study Implicates Hippocampal Region in Schizophrenia

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A subfield of the hippocampal formation may be involved in the early stages of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Study Supports Protocol for Cardiac Computed Tomography

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adenosine stress computed tomography (CT) may have similar accuracy in discovering stress-induced myocardial perfusion defects as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Costs Escalating for Patients With Spine Problems

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1997, national expenditures for spine conditions have dramatically increased, while self-reported mental and physical health and activity limitations in spine patients have significantly worsened, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

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Joint-Preserving Treatment Can Delay Hip Replacement

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Periacetabular osteotomy, or reorienting a shallow hip socket to better engage the head of the femur, can preserve hip-joint function and avoid a full hip replacement for years, according to a study in the Sept. 1 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Study Supports MRI Use for Renal Lesions in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is acceptable imaging to be performed in women with renal lesions incidentally detected during routine antenatal ultrasonography, according to a study in the September issue of Urology.

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Angiography Before Vascular Surgery May Be Beneficial

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Routine coronary angiography may improve long-term outcomes in certain patients undergoing surgery for peripheral arterial disease, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Academic Medical Centers Active and Diverse in Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Research at academic medical centers is active and diverse, with nearly a quarter of life-science researchers receiving no funding, and relationships with industry more commonly seen among translational and clinical researchers than basic science researchers, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Imaging Strategy Can Help Assess Pancreatic Perfusion

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and pharmacokinetic modeling can be used to assess microcirculation of the pancreas in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study reported in the September issue of Radiology.

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