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Kidney Disease Risk May Be Higher in Allergic Diabetics

Last Updated: October 02, 2009.

In male diabetics, there is a correlation between eosinophil counts and microalbuminuria that may point to increased risk of diabetic kidney disease in those with allergic rhinitis or asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In male diabetics, there is a correlation between eosinophil counts and microalbuminuria that may point to increased risk of diabetic kidney disease in those with allergic rhinitis or asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Michiaki Fukui, M.D., of the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine in Japan, and colleagues conducted a study of 416 men and 367 women with type 2 diabetes. They evaluated the relationship between peripheral eosinophil count and albumin excretion rate -- a key indicator of kidney disease -- as well as its relationship to major cardiovascular risk factors.

In men there was a positive association between eosinophil count and albumin excretion rate, systolic blood pressure and serum triglyceride concentration, but there was no association between eosinophil count and albumin excretion rate in women, the investigators found. After performing logistic regression analysis, the researchers determined that eosinophil count, diabetes duration, glycosylated hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure and serum triglyceride concentration were independent determinants of albumin excretion rate in males.

"The intriguing concept of a role for eosinophils in diabetic nephropathy holds great promise for the development of new preventive measures involving antiallergy agents," the authors write. "Large prospective trials are needed to assess better the effects of allergic disorders on diabetic nephropathy in men with type 2 diabetes."

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