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Technique Found Effective for Intracranial Aneurysms

Last Updated: October 02, 2009.

Stent-assisted coil embolization is a safe and effective treatment for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms occurring during subarachnoid hemorrhage that are difficult to treat by other techniques, according to a study in the October issue of Radiology.

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Stent-assisted coil embolization is a safe and effective treatment for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms occurring during subarachnoid hemorrhage that are difficult to treat by other techniques, according to a study in the October issue of Radiology.

Olli I. Tahtinen, M.D., from Tampere University Hospital in Finland, and colleagues retrospectively analyzed the safety and efficacy of stent-assisted coil embolization in 61 patients who developed acutely ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms during acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

After a mean angiographic follow-up of 12.1 months, the researchers found a 72 percent technical success rate, a 21 percent technique-related complication rate, and a 20 percent 30-day mortality rate. The clinical outcome was good for 69 percent of patients (as assessed by a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of four or five), with only one case of rebleeding.

"Stent-assisted coil embolization is a feasible method for the endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms that are difficult to treat surgically or with balloon-assisted embolization during acute subarachnoid hemorrhage," Tahtinen and colleagues conclude. "The risk of subsequent rerupture of the aneurysm seems to be reduced for aneurysms treated early compared with that for non-secured aneurysms."

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