Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Exercise Could Help Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

Last Updated: October 12, 2009.

People with or without chronic kidney disease who are physically inactive have higher odds of mortality than their more active counterparts, and there may be survival benefits for chronic kidney disease patients who become more physically active, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- People with or without chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are physically inactive have higher odds of mortality than their more active counterparts, and there may be survival benefits for CKD patients who become more physically active, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Srinivasan Beddhu, M.D., of the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, and colleagues conducted a study of 15,368 adults, of whom 5.9 percent had CKD. The subjects provided information via the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III and were divided into inactive, insufficiently active, and active groups.

The researchers found that, among those with CKD, 28 percent were physically inactive versus 13.5 percent of those without CKD. In the non-CKD population, compared with the physically inactive group, the hazard ratios of mortality for the insufficiently active and active groups were 0.6 and 0.59, respectively. In the CKD population, compared with the physically inactive group, the mortality hazard ratios for the insufficiently active and active groups were 0.58 and 0.44, respectively.

"The functional limitations that are commonly seen in the CKD and dialysis population could be improved with increased physical activity," the authors write. "Increased physical activity might have a survival benefit in the CKD population. This is particularly important as most patients with stage III CKD die before they develop ESRD [end-stage renal disease]."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Retrovirus Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Next: Text Message Alerts May Improve Drug Adherence

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: