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Since 1999, Uterine Cancer Incidence, Mortality Up

Last Updated: December 06, 2018.

The incidence of uterine cancer and uterine cancer deaths has increased since 1999, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of uterine cancer and uterine cancer deaths has increased since 1999, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

S. Jane Henley, M.S.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues used data from the CDC National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program as well as mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System to examine recent trends in uterine cancer incidence and mortality.

The researchers found that during 1999 to 2015, the incidence rates of uterine cancer increased 0.7 percent per year, while death rates increased 1.1 percent per year during 1999 to 2016. Compared with women in other racial/ethnic groups, non-Hispanic white women had a smaller increase in incidence rates. A total of 53,911 new uterine cancer cases were reported in 2015, corresponding to 27 cases per 100,000 women; 10,733 uterine cancer deaths were reported in 2016 (five deaths per 100,000 women). The incidence of uterine cancer was higher among non-Hispanic black and white women than among other racial/ethnic groups (27 versus 19 to 23 per 100,0000). Black women had higher uterine cancer deaths than other racial/ethnic groups (nine versus four to five per 100,000).

"Promoting awareness among women and health care providers of the need for timely evaluation of abnormal vaginal bleeding can increase the chance that uterine cancer is detected early and treated appropriately," the authors write.

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