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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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June 2019 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: July 01, 2019.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for June 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Increase Seen in Cryptosporidiosis Outbreaks From 2007 to 2019

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2017, there was an increase in the annual number of reported cryptosporidiosis outbreaks in the United States, according to a study published online June 27 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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MSSP ACOs May Not Improve Spending, Quality of Care

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After adjustment for the nonrandom exit of clinicians, the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) is not associated with improvements in spending or quality, according to a study published online June 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Americans Concerned About Clinician Burnout

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly three-quarters of Americans are concerned about burnout among their clinicians, according to a survey released June 17 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP).

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Micronutrient Deficiencies Often Found With Celiac Disease Dx

WENDESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Micronutrient deficiencies remain common in adults at the time of celiac disease (CD) diagnosis, according to a study published online June 24 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Death From Specific Causes Up for Veterans With PTSD

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), all-cause mortality is elevated, especially death from suicide, accidental injury, and viral hepatitis, according to a study published online June 24 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Colonoscopy Quality Not Affected by Sedation Method

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients at average risk undergoing screening colonoscopies, there is no benefit associated with deep sedation versus moderate sedation, according to a study recently published in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

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Antacid Use in First Year of Life Tied to Later Fracture Risk

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are given acid suppression therapy (AST) in their first year of life are more likely to subsequently break a bone, according to a study published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

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Rotavirus Vaccine Led to Reduced Disease Prevalence, Season Duration

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of rotavirus vaccination has reduced disease prevalence and season duration in the United States, according to research published in the June 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Poor Oral Health Not Linked to Gastrointestinal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported poor oral health is not associated with gastrointestinal cancer risk, although it may be associated with hepatobiliary cancer, specifically hepatocellular carcinoma, according to a study published online June 8 in the United European Gastroenterology Journal.

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First States to Expand Medicaid Had Largest Bump in Cancer Screening

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The first states to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act saw the largest increases in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening from 2012 to 2016, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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New England Journal of Medicine Picks New Editor-in-Chief

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The new editor-in-chief of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine is Eric J. Rubin, M.D., Ph.D., who was selected after a worldwide search and plans to start in September, according to the Massachusetts Medical Society, which publishes the journal.

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Health Care Workers With ARIs Often Work While Symptomatic

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Almost all health care workers (HCWs) with acute respiratory illness (ARI) report working at least one day while symptomatic, according to a study published online June 18 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

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Surgeons' Unprofessional Behavior Tied to Higher Complication Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients whose surgeons have higher numbers of coworker reports about unprofessional behavior may be at increased risk for postsurgical complications, according to a study published online June 19 in JAMA Surgery.

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Yogurt Consumption Linked to Reduced CRC Adenoma Risk in Men

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Yogurt consumption is associated with a reduced risk for colorectal adenomas in men, according to a research letter published online June 18 in Gut.

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Prophylactic IVC Filters Worsen Outcomes for Bariatric Surgery

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing bariatric surgery, use of prophylactic inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) is associated with worse clinical outcomes and increased use of health care resources, according to a study published in the June 24 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Patterns of Inpatient Opioid Use Linked to Long-Term Use

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Specific patterns of opioid administration to opioid-naive inpatients are associated with risk for long-term use after discharge, according to a study published online June 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Drug Makers Challenge New Rule Requiring Drug Prices in TV Ads

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Three large drug makers have launched a legal challenge against the Trump administration's rule requiring the prices of drugs to be included in television ads.

The New York Times Article

PPI Use for Up to Three Years Safe During Anticoagulant Tx

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Use of pantoprazole for up to three years to prevent upper gastrointestinal events in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy with aspirin and/or rivaroxaban has a similar safety profile to placebo except for an increased risk for enteric infections, according to a study published online May 29 in Gastroenterology.

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FDA Warns of Infections From Fecal Transplants After One Death

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- On Thursday, federal health officials announced that a patient has died after fecal microbiota transplantation, highlighting the potential for severe infections linked to the procedure.

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Drug- and Alcohol-Related Deaths Higher After Bariatric Surgery

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Drug- and alcohol-related mortality is significantly higher than expected in the seven years following bariatric surgery, according to a study recently published in Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

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Infliximab Introduction Has Not Cut IBD-Related Hospitalizations

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Marketplace introduction of infliximab has not resulted in reductions in the population rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related hospitalizations or intestinal resections or colectomies, according to a study published online June 13 in Gut.

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Most Providers Unaware of Online Feedback About Themselves

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care providers in the United Kingdom have little direct experience with online feedback, rarely encourage it, and often view it as having little value for improving the quality of health services, according to a study published online June 2 in the Journal of Health Services Research & Policy.

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Nitrate Pollution of Tap Water May Cause Thousands of Cancer Cases

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nitrate pollution of drinking water has serious health and economic consequences, according to a study published online June 11 in Environmental Research.

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Weight Loss Surgery May Not Relieve Acid Reflux

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Reflux symptoms return in about half of patients who undergo gastric bypass, according to a study published online June 4 in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.

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Diagnostic Yield of Lynch Syndrome Screening Drops With Age

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The incremental diagnostic yield of Lynch syndrome (LS) screening decreases substantially after age 70 to 75 years, according to a study published online June 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Number of Cancer Survivors Set to Top 22 Million by 2030

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of cancer survivors is projected to increase to more than 22.1 million by Jan. 1, 2030, based on growth and aging of the population alone, according to a study published online June 11 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Marketing OK'd for Device to Help Reduce IBS Symptoms in Adolescents

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The IB-Stim has received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first medical device used to help alleviate functional abdominal pain in 11- to 18-year-old patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the agency announced Friday.

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Access to Health Care Has Little Impact on Longevity

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Health care has modest effects on extending life expectancy in the United States, while behavioral and social determinants may have larger effects, according to a review published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Half an Hour of Sun Exposure Daily May Lower Risk for Pediatric IBD

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Higher sun exposure in the previous summer or winter is associated with a lower risk for having pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a study recently published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

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Irritable Bowel Symptoms Tied to Intestinal, Brain Abnormalities

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A greater number of intestinal and brain function abnormalities increases the burden of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study recently published in Gastroenterology.

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Gastric Bypass Tied to Higher Fracture Risk Versus Gastric Band

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is a 73 percent increased risk for nonvertebral fracture after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) versus adjustable gastric banding (AGB), according to a study published online May 15 in JAMA Surgery.

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Rapid Cycling Work Roster Improves Resident Sleep Practices

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A rapidly cycling work roster (RCWR) is effective in reducing weekly work hours and the occurrence of >16 consecutive-hour shifts as well as improving sleep duration of resident physicians, according to a study published online May 20 in SLEEP.

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Survey Indicates Physician Misconduct Is Underreported

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Physician misconduct is being underreported and most Americans do not know where to file a complaint, according to a report published by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

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Parkinson Disease Incidence Lower in Hep C Patients Who Receive Antivirals

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of Parkinson disease (PD) is lower for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who receive interferon-based antiviral therapy, according to a study published online June 5 in JAMA Neurology.

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Cholecystectomy Reduces Risk for Stroke in Patients With Gallstones

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with gallstones, cholecystectomy is associated with a reduced risk for overall, ischemic, and hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study published online June 5 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Young Male Adults Have Lower Cancer Burden Than Women

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For young adults, there have been some notable findings for overall cancer incidence rates and death rates, according to a study published online May 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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ACP Issues Position on Response to Physician Impairment

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Providing assistance for physician impairment and rehabilitation is addressed in a position statement issued by the American College of Physicians and published online June 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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