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Female Early-Career, Midcareer Pediatricians Earn Less Than Male Peers

Last Updated: September 10, 2019.

Female pediatricians earn less than their male counterparts and take more responsibility for household tasks, according to two studies published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Female pediatricians earn less than their male counterparts and take more responsibility for household tasks, according to two studies published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

Mary Pat Frintner, M.S.P.H., from the American Academy of Pediatrics in Itasca, Illinois, and colleagues examined 2016 data on earnings from the American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatrician Life and Career Experience Study for early-career and midcareer pediatricians. The analytical sample included 998 participants. The researchers found that the overall pediatrician-reported mean annual income was $189,804. Women earned about 76 percent of what men earned (~$51,000 less) before any adjustment; about 87 percent of what men earned (~$26,000 less) after adjustment for common labor force characteristics; and about 94 percent of what men earned (~ $8,000 less) after further adjustment, including work-family characteristics.

Amy J. Starmer, M.D., M.P.H., from Boston Children's Hospital, and colleagues used 2015 data for 1,293 participants from the American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatrician Life and Career Experience Study to examine the impact of gender on household responsibilities, satisfaction, and work-life balance. The researchers found that for 13 of 16 household responsibilities, such as cleaning, cooking, and routine child care, women were more likely than men to report having primary responsibility. Relative to others, women were less satisfied with their share of responsibilities (52 versus 62 percent).

"As we move forward in our demands for equal pay for equal work, we must also advocate for and alter social norms around male participation in domestic spheres, and particularly child care responsibilities," write the authors of an accompanying editorial.

Abstract/Full Text - Frintner (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract/Full Text - Starmer (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)


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