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Symptom Responses in Spinal Pain Found of Limited Use

Last Updated: December 10, 2009.

In the conservative management of spinal pain, clinically induced changes in spinal symptoms (i.e., symptom responses) have limited prognostic value, according to a study in the Nov. 15 issue of Spine.

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In the conservative management of spinal pain, clinically induced changes in spinal symptoms (i.e., symptom responses) have limited prognostic value, according to a study in the Nov. 15 issue of Spine.

Angeliki G. Chorti, of the University of Warwick in Coventry, U.K., and colleagues conducted a systematic review of 22 relevant studies including 18 patient cohorts.

For most symptom responses, the researchers found that there was no association with clinical outcomes. They also found some evidence to support the use of symptom responses to inform management only for changes in pain location and/or intensity with repeated spinal movement testing, or as a response to treatment management.

"Further investigation of symptom responses in spinal pain, especially with regard to changes in symptom location and/or intensity is needed before symptom response can be used to inform prognosis and management," the authors conclude.

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