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Out-of-Office BP Readings More Predictive in Black Adults

Last Updated: October 09, 2019.

Home-based blood pressure readings are more accurate for non-Hispanic black adults than readings in the physician's office, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Hypertension.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Home-based blood pressure readings are more accurate for non-Hispanic black adults than readings in the physician's office, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Hypertension.

Florian Rader, M.D., from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and colleagues analyzed data from 1,262 black and 927 white participants in the Dallas Heart Study (aged 30 to 64 years). Participants underwent standardized clinic and out-of-office blood pressure monitoring as well as assessment of left ventricular mass index.

The researchers found that out-of-office blood pressure was a stronger determinant of left ventricular hypertrophy than clinic blood pressure (odds ratios per 10 mm Hg: 1.48 [95 percent confidence interval, 1.34 to 1.64] for out-of-office systolic blood pressure, 1.15 [1.04 to 1.28] for clinic systolic blood pressure, 1.71 [1.43 to 2.05] for out-of-office diastolic blood pressure, and 1.03 [0.86 to 1.24] for clinic diastolic blood pressure). Other independent determinants of hypertrophy included non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity, treatment status, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. The differential association between out-of-office and clinic blood pressure with hypertrophy was more pronounced among treated black participants than among treated white or untreated participants.

"Our results underscore the importance of hypertension management programs outside the medical office to prevent hypertensive heart disease, especially in high-risk black adults," the authors write.

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