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Part-Time Ob-Gyn Faculty Projected to Increase

Last Updated: December 30, 2009.

The number of full-time faculty in obstetrics and gynecology has more than doubled since the 1970s, although the number of part-time faculty is projected to increase in the next five years, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The number of full-time faculty in obstetrics and gynecology has more than doubled since the 1970s, although the number of part-time faculty is projected to increase in the next five years, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

William F. Rayburn, M.D., from the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, and colleagues surveyed the chairs of obstetrics and gynecology at all 125 medical schools in the United States regarding the number of current full-time and part-time faculty in each specialty and the expected department size in five years.

The researchers found that the number of full-time faculty per department increased from a mean of 25 to 29 since the last survey in 1994, and doubled since the first survey in 1977. Since 1977, the number of women significantly increased, with women currently making up half of all faculty. Faculties were largest at private schools and research-oriented departments. Part-time faculty comprised an average of 21.2 percent of the total faculty. Significantly more chairs projected an increase in faculty compared with 1994 (67.2 versus 48.8 percent), particularly part-time faculty and general obstetrician-gynecologists and maternal-fetal medicine specialists.

"Continued growth in department sizes was accompanied by considerably more women and more part-time faculty," Rayburn and colleagues conclude. "The change in work force to more part-time faculty is critical for academic chairs and deans to track so that faculty needs can be more accurately projected."

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