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Use of A1C in the Diagnosis of Diabetes Supported

Last Updated: January 04, 2010.

Changes in the American Diabetes Association's new clinical practice recommendations include the use of A1C in diagnosing diabetes and identifying those at higher risk of future diabetes, according to a position statement published in a supplement to the January issue of Diabetes Care.

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in the American Diabetes Association's new clinical practice recommendations include the use of A1C in diagnosing diabetes and identifying those at higher risk of future diabetes, according to a position statement published in a supplement to the January issue of Diabetes Care.

According to the authors, the ADA did not previously support using A1C for diagnosing diabetes. However, the organization now backs an international committee's recent recommendation of a threshold of 6.5 percent and greater for the diagnosis. An A1C of 5.7 to 6.4 percent can be used to identify those with pre-diabetes.

In addition, the authors recommend that diabetes self-management education be provided upon diagnosis and thereafter as needed, with quality of life and effective self-management being key outcomes that should be measured and tracked. Aspirin therapy should be considered for primary cardiovascular disease prevention in those with a 10-year cardiovascular risk greater than 10 percent, but evidence doesn't support aspirin for lower-risk individuals.

"The National Diabetes Education Program maintains an online resource to help health care professionals design and implement more effective health care delivery systems for those with diabetes. It is clear that optimal diabetes management requires an organized, systematic approach and involvement of a coordinated team of dedicated health care professionals working in an environment where quality care is a priority," the authors conclude.

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