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HIV Infection May Increase Fracture Risk in Women

Last Updated: January 08, 2010.

Postmenopausal HIV-positive women are more likely to have low bone density and high bone turnover, possibly increasing their risk of fractures, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal HIV-positive women are more likely to have low bone density and high bone turnover, possibly increasing their risk of fractures, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Michael T. Yin, M.D., from the Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues examined the association between bone mineral density, fractures, and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and markers of bone turnover in 92 HIV-positive and 95 HIV-negative postmenopausal Hispanic and African-American women.

As determined by T and Z scores (adjusted for body mass index), the researchers found that HIV-positive women had significantly lower bone density at the spine, total hip, and femoral neck. HIV-positive women -- particularly those receiving antiretroviral treatment -- also had significantly higher levels of an inflammatory cytokine and two markers of bone turnover. After adjusting for age, ethnicity, body mass index and alcohol intake, HIV-positive status was significantly associated with lower spine and hip bone mineral density.

"The lower bone mineral density, higher prevalence of low bone mineral density and higher levels of bone turnover markers detected in HIV-positive postmenopausal minority women could place them at high risk for future fractures," Yin and colleagues conclude.

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