Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Survival Improving for Children With Birth Defects

Last Updated: January 20, 2010.

Long-term survival in children with at least one birth defect depends on the type of defect as well as the birth year and proportion of pregnancy terminations, possibly because pregnancies with the worst outlook are being terminated, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in The Lancet.

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survival in children with at least one birth defect depends on the type of defect as well as the birth year and proportion of pregnancy terminations, possibly because pregnancies with the worst outlook are being terminated, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in The Lancet.

Peter W.G. Tennant, from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, and colleagues analyzed data from 13,758 cases of congenital anomaly delivered in the north of England from 1985 to 2003. Survival data was available for 10,850 of these children.

The researchers found that overall 20-year survival was 85.5 percent but varied substantially based on the type of abnormality. Survival was as high as 97.6 percent for orofacial clefts and as low as 66.2 percent for nervous system anomalies. Fetal terminations for congenital anomaly significantly increased over this period, from 12.4 to 18.3 percent. Survival was independently predicted by the proportion of terminations (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.95) and year of birth (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.94).

"We report robust estimates of survival up to 20 years of age for a range of congenital anomaly groups and subtypes, some of which have been infrequently reported previously," Tennant and colleagues conclude. They speculate that the most likely explanation for the dependence of survival on terminations and year of birth "is the selective termination of pregnancies with the worst prognoses."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial


Previous: Low-Risk Criteria Help Guide Care for Infants With Fever Next: Diabetes Patients May Be at Higher Risk for Lung Diseases

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: