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Anticoagulation May Improve Outcomes in COVID-19 Patients

Last Updated: May 07, 2020.

For patients hospitalized with COVID-19, systematic anticoagulation may be associated with improved outcomes, according to a research letter published online May 6 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

THURSDAY, May 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For patients hospitalized with COVID-19, systematic anticoagulation (AC) may be associated with improved outcomes, according to a research letter published online May 6 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Ishan Paranjpe, from the Hasso Plattner Institute for Digital Health at Mount Sinai in New York City, and colleagues examined the association between administration of in-hospital AC and survival in a cohort of 2,773 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 between March 14 and April 11, 2020.

The researchers found that 28 percent of patients received systemic AC during their hospital course. The median time from admission to AC administration was two days, and the median duration of AC treatment was three days. In-hospital mortality was 22.5 versus 22.8 percent for patients who were treated with AC versus not treated with AC, with a median survival of 21 and 14 days, respectively. The likelihood of requiring invasive mechanical ventilation was increased for patients who received AC (29.8 versus 8.1 percent). In the 395 patients who required mechanical ventilation, in-hospital mortality was 29.1 versus 62.7 percent for patients who were treated with AC versus not treated with AC, with a median survival of 21 and nine days, respectively. Longer duration of AC treatment was associated with a reduced risk for mortality in a multivariate proportional hazard ratio (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.86 per day).

"It's important to note that further analysis and prospective studies are required to determine the effectiveness for widespread use of anticoagulants in hospitalized COVID-19 patients," a coauthor said in a statement.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical industry.

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