Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Cardiology | Internal Medicine | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Neurology | Pulmonology | Radiology | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Study Finds Speckle Tracking Aids in Patient Selection

Last Updated: February 11, 2010.

Radial dyssynchrony by speckle tracking may be useful in predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with borderline QRS and wide QRS durations, according to research published in the February Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

THURSDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Radial dyssynchrony by speckle tracking may be useful in predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with borderline QRS and wide QRS durations, according to research published in the February Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Olusegun Oyenuga, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues analyzed data from 201 patients with heart failure and ejection fraction (EF) of 35 percent or less who were referred for CRT. Seventy eight had borderline QRS duration between 100 and 130 ms, and 123 had wide QRS duration greater than 130 ms. Dyssynchrony was evaluated using several approaches, including interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD), speckle tracking radial strain for septal to posterior wall delay, and Doppler imaging longitudinal velocity opposing wall delay.

The researchers found that, although IVMD and longitudinal dyssynchrony values predicted EF response in those with wide QRS duration, they didn't in those with a borderline QRS duration. However, speckle tracking radial dyssynchrony of 130 ms or greater predicted EF response in patients with wide or borderline QRS intervals.

"In patients with QRS duration of 120 to 150 ms, echocardiography is potentially valuable to avoid treating likely non-responders," the authors of an accompanying editorial write. "In patients with QRS duration <120 ms the prevalence of potential CRT responders can be expected to be low or even very low. In such a population, the accurate identification of the rare potential responder becomes all-important, and a high specificity of the echocardiographic method is imperative to avoid treating a large number of false positives."

A co-author reported receiving research support from several medical device companies.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Protein May Block Letrozole Therapy in Breast Cancer Next: Gout Associated With Higher Heart Attack Risk in Women

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: