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Date of last update: 10/21/2017.

Forum Name: Lung Cancer

Question: Lung Health After Quitting Smoking


 Nicole Chenxi - Sun Apr 19, 2009 1:45 am

I was a light smoker for most of college, around 3 cigarettes a day to a pack a week at my worst, with multiple gaps of a few months when I wouldn't smoke at all. For the last year I've been smoking very little, maybe three packs the whole year. What are the long-term effects of such smoking? If I quit now, when would my lungs likely return to normal? How much worse is my risk of lung cancer compared to someone who never smoked? Thanks!
 Dr. Tamer Fouad - Tue May 26, 2009 6:35 am

User avatar Hello,

A meaningful risk assessment is impossible without an extensive medical examination and 'exposure' history.

Smoking is the single most important risk factor in lung cancer accounting for 80-90% of all cases of lung cancer.

Chronic heavy smokers have a 30 fold increase in relative risk compared to never smokers. Heavy smoking is usually defined as more than 10-15 cigarettes a day.

This risk varies according to the age at onset of smoking, degree of inhalation, life time duration of smoking, use of filter and the tar/nicotine content of cigarettes.

Other factors such as occupational asbestos exposure also affect risk. I say this only to stress that there may be many other risks that we still don't know about.

The good news is that abstinence, even smoking reduction results in a decreasing risk. Abstainers had an 80 to 90 % reduction in risk of lung cancer compared to current smokers. However, lung cancer risk remains higher than in the never smoker (twice).

I hope this helps answer your question.

Best regards,

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