Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry Answers

"The information provided on www.doctorslounge.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her physician."

Back to Psychiatry Answers List

Forum Name: Psychiatric Topics

Question: Talking to Oneself


 Chesire-Cat - Fri Jan 02, 2009 5:32 pm

Talking to oneself or thinking aloud is often a sign of madness to people. To my understanding it isn't quit a psychotic symptom like having thoughts stolen, thoughts broadcast or having no mind like a buddha. Once one has completed therapy and medication should one continue to think aloud as one has been such a thinker, or is it a sign of ongoing problems?
People often read aloud or solve problems aloud or even consider to themself their experience of something like a glass of water. Avoiding talking to oneself sounds like something for a very worried person. I, having been medicated myself often wonder if i am causing myself needless concern thinking aloud. Even as i type this im reading it aloud, deleting errors and retyping these concerns. Certainly my behavior may have bothered people before, but is there a reason to change these ways?
 Tim W Latsko - Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:03 pm

Consider........a problem is only a problem if it perceived to be a problem.....now in consideration of the aforemention, if your thinking aloud is causing you occupational, social, or relational difficulty then it is a problem and so treat your thinking aloud as one. I hope this helps and may I recommend that you consider a psyhciatric consultation by a local provider to ensure all you medical concerns are addressed. keep us posted

| Check a doctor's response to similar questions

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us