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Forum Name: Urology Topics

Question: Nighttime Urination


 ChristineVA - Thu Aug 17, 2006 5:53 am

I'm a 42 y/o female that occasionally has an odd thing happen. This started again 2 days ago. I will be fine all day, then as soon as I lay down to go to bed, I have to urinate. It's not just the urge to urinate, I really do have to go. Just last night, I urinated, laid in bed and read a book for 45 minutes. During that time, I felt increasing pressure to go. At the end of the 45 minutes, I urinated again and seemed to have a close to full bladder. Then 30 minutes later I had to go again. I did okay for another 4 hours, then had to get up and go again. Then did okay for another 4 hours.

This came on suddenly. I have had it happen before and usually resolves itself in a few days. When this started about 8 years ago, I had a cystoscopy which was normal. In the past, I have "run" to the doctor but no infection is ever found.

I have also been checked for diabetes 3 or 4 times and my blood sugar levels are always very normal.

Is this some type of overactive bladder issue? And what does laying down have to do with this?
 Dr. Tamer Fouad - Thu Nov 23, 2006 3:56 pm

User avatar Hello,

Nocturia is defined as the need to get up at least 2x or more per night.

Neurogenic bladder (overactive bladder), UTI's, and chronic cystitis have to be ruled out. There are other conditions that cause the symptoms of frequent and night time urination including endocrine disorders (for example, diabetes, diabetes insipidus).

Drinking too much fluid before bedtime -- particularly coffee, caffeinated beverages, or alcohol. Certain drugs such as diuretics, cardiac glycosides, demeclocycline, lithium, methoxyflurane, phenytoin, propoxyphene, and excessive vitamin D.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (common in older men) as well as chronic renal failure, congestive heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea and sometimes if you experience jet lag are all causes of nocturia.

In your case I would first re-exclude UTI and diabetes before considering an overactive bladder.

Best regards,

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