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Forum Name: Urology Topics

Question: Microscopic Blood in Urine


 lizak - Tue Jan 23, 2007 1:38 pm

My husband is 30 years old. He had lower abdominal and groin pain and the doctor said that is probably the beginning of hernia - since it always would start when he should pick up something heavy.
At the same time they did urine test and found microscopic blood in urine. They did CT adn found nothing - which i believe ruled out kidney and bladder stones.
He does take blood pressure medication - but the doctor did not seem to think that it would cause blood in urine - although i always thought so.
No he is scheduled for Cyctoscopy. Do you think it might be something serious? He is very young.
In addition, close to a month ago he got this rush on his body. I have done some research and read about swimmer's itch which also causes blood in urine? Is it possible? He has been swimming in the pool at the time he got it. He did not show it to the urologist bc he did not think it was connected. I am worried that it might be something serious - like cancer.....please help. Thanks
 Dr. Leigh Anderson - Wed Jan 24, 2007 12:04 am

User avatar Blood in the urine is a common problem. The medical term for red blood cells in the urine is hematuria. Sometimes blood in the urine is a sign of a more serious problem in the urinary tract. Other times it is not serious and requires no treatment.


In men, the genitals and prostate are considered part of the urinary system. The prostate surrounds the urethra in men. It is made up of glands that secrete a fluid that is part of semen. The prostate often becomes enlarged in older men.
Blood in urine is not always visible. If the amount of blood is small, the urine looks normal. This is called microscopic hematuria because the blood cells are visible only under a microscope. Typically, this is discovered when you have a urine test for some other reason.

A trace amount of blood in your urine is normal. The average person with a healthy urinary tract excretes about 1 million red blood cells (RBC) in the urine each day. This amount of blood is not visible. This is not considered hematuria.

An abnormal amount of blood in the urine can be acute (new, occurring suddenly) or chronic (ongoing, long term). Acute hematuria can occur just once, or it can occur many times.

However, a Cyctoscopy should be done to rule out any possibility of Cancer being present.

Keep In Touch

Dr. Anderson
 lizak - Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:21 am

Thank you - but i am still not clear on this. Since stones and bladder infection has been already ruled out - does microscopic blood in urine automatically means cancer or can it be nothing without any cause? My understanding was that hematuria is not a dicease - but rather a sympton. If so - it has to mean something.
Thanks
 Dr. Leigh Anderson - Thu Jan 25, 2007 1:52 am

User avatar No, Microscopic blood does not mean there is evidence of Cancer, It is normal to have trace amounts of blood in the urine.

Keep In Touch

Dr. Anderson
 lizak - Mon Jan 29, 2007 9:51 am

Thanks
He just had cystoscopy and nothing was found. The doctor said that it means nothing is wrong. Do you think anymore tests should be done?
Thanks
 Dr. Leigh Anderson - Mon Jan 29, 2007 10:13 am

User avatar If your doctor feel comfortable with the results, It does not sound like any more test need to be performed.

Congratulations and Good Luck

Dr. Anderson
 clairebear9898 - Thu Feb 22, 2007 10:14 pm

I have had microscopic and gross hematuria off and on for 2 years. My doctor's haven't found anything wrong with me, even though it still scares me when I look in the toilet and see red. I guess some people just pee blood

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