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Forum Name: Urinary tract infections

Question: Very concerned and unsure


 Nardee - Tue Dec 21, 2004 6:30 pm

Hi, sorry if my explanation is little hard to understand but I lack much of the terminology required to properly explain myself but i'll try as best as I can.

I am a 24 year old male and haven't been sexually active for about three months. Now, about a month and a half ago a swelling appeared just inside the praeputial sphincter of my penis. It appears to be just a little flap of skin and it causes me no pain. This is very embarassing but due to this flap of skin I find it difficult to urinate straight. The strange thing is it just appeared one day.

http://www.circumstitions.com/Anatomy.html
According to the diagram found above, I think it is the 'meatus' that is swollen.

I was not sure which forum to post this in, so please excuse me if this is not the correct one. I would really appreciate any advice you could give me because I am very concerned.
Thank you .
 Dr. Anthony Solomon - Mon Dec 27, 2004 6:26 pm

Hi,

You have assisted me by enclosing the diagram of the male genital anatomy though which you have identified the location of your complaint as the “meatus”. If your lesion is not there, then the rest of my response is not applicable.

The urethral meatus is the external opening of the urethra through which urine is voided.

You complain of a painless little flap of skin that is located just inside the urethra. It is most likely that the lesion is visible or partially protruding through the meatus. The lesion is embarrassing and prevents a straight urine stream. Naturally, any growth or swelling located at the meatus would partially obstruct the free flow of urine.

You have not stated if you had unprotected sex in the past although there has been sexual abstinence for about three months.

It is very difficult to attempt a diagnosis without visual examination, but the picture is very suggestive of a meatal wart which falls under the group of genital warts.

Individuals presenting with genital warts rarely report symptoms other than the appearance of bumps or growths on their genitalia. In men, most genital warts occur on the penile shaft, glans, urethral meatus, scrotum, perianal area, pubic skin, upper thighs or groin folds.

It is advisable to see a genitourinary physician or a dermatovenereologist for confirmation. Without treatment, genital warts may disappear, stay the same or grow larger in size or number. Most genital warts are treated because they are aesthetically unpleasant.

Thank you for contacting our website.


Dr Anthony Solomon
MB BS DTM&H DIP.VEN FRSM
Consultant Physician, Tropical & Genitourinary Medicine
 Nardee - Sat Jan 01, 2005 8:48 pm

Thank you so much for your helpful reply. Upon visiting a specialist, your diagnosis was correct and the wart has since been removed. I thank you again for your professional response, and finally I can put my mind at ease.

Best regards
 Dr. Anthony Solomon - Sun Jan 02, 2005 7:22 am

Thank you for sharing this news.

I am pleased that my response has been helpful in reaching a diagnosis.

For more information on genital warts, please read my other responses to site visitors at
the INFECTIOUS DISEASES forum. These are available under the following guest headings, authors and dates:

HPV (livvie0987) 16 Nov 2004
HPV (tim9002) 25 Nov 2004
Genital Warts (rsw) 25 Nov 2004

The presence of one sexually transmitted infection raises the possibility of another, so have a full screen for STDs. It is also advisable to notify sexual partners so that they can be investigated and treated.


Dr Anthony Solomon
MB BS DTM&H DIP.VEN FRSM
Consultant Physician, Tropical & Genitourinary Medicine

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