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Date of last update: 8/13/2017.

Forum Name: Urology Topics

Question: Ultrasound Shows BB-Sized Mass In Testicle


 triflyr - Tue Feb 09, 2010 5:03 pm

Hello, I am a 46 year old male new to this website and am looking for more advice. I saw my Urologist today for a follow-up from last week when I went in due to the epidydimus on my right testicle being inflamed. He didn't think it was inflamed much and didn't find anything on my testicle during his exam. As a precaution, he went ahead and sent me for an ultrasound. The imaging report indicated that there appeared to be a bb-sized mass inside the testicle. He doesn't want me to do anything but a self examination once a month for the next three months and then go back for another ultrasound. Is this sound advice? If this is a cancer, isn't there some other way to find out sooner rather than wait around for it to grow or possibly spread? Thanks for your help. I am very worried.
 Dr.M.Aroon kamath - Sat Jun 19, 2010 11:53 am

User avatar Hi,
High orchidectomy (radical orchidectomy) has remained the preferred treatment option for testicular masses.

With the increasing use of high-frequency scrotal ultrasonography in assessment of male infertility, non-palpable, small, incidentally discovered testicular lesions is on the increase.What is the best way of dealing with them has remained controversial.

There have been studies in which small incidental non-palpable testicular masses were safely followed with serial ultrasound and did not show significant increase in growth warranting surgery.

Especially, non-palpable testicular masses less than 1 cm on ultrasound seemed to be amenable to ultrasound surveillance supplemented by clinical monitoring. Surgery is advised if the patient cannot continue surveillance, or if the lesion shows rapid growth consistent with a malignancy, or if tumor markers are positive.

This method is not widely practiced but, is an option that is undergoing trials & surveillance seems to show initial promise as a viable option.

Best wishes!

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